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Although not required, many former STLCOP students participate in residencies after completing their sixth and final year of college on rotations and receiving their Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree.

Although not required, many former STLCOP students participate in residencies after completing their sixth and final year of college on rotations and receiving their Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree. Sister Mary Louise Degenhart, special assistant to the president at the College and expert on all things residency-related, said the motivation to do a residency is obvious. More often than not, employers are going to hire a pharmacist with residency experience over a pharmacist without the experience. There are two kinds of residencies: PGY1 residencies are for recent graduates and feature a variety of aspects of pharmacy practice; PGY2 residencies follow PGY1 pharmacies, and focus on specific areas of practice, such as oncology or ambulatory care. PGY2’s are more in-depth, according to Degenhart. She said more and more pharmacy students are electing to do at least one residency after graduating, adding that there’s a lot of competition. Most practitioners agree that a good residency program is equivalent to two to three years of practice experience, she said. Residents receive a stipend, which equals about half of what a pharmacist in the same position would make, according to Degenhart.

Residencies at STLCOP

A Clinical Foundation for Leadership in Direct Patient Care

Pharmacy residencies provide the additional experience and specialization that today’s patient-centered health care teams require. Residents receive real-world training to effectively manage increasingly complex drug therapies for patients and work in collaboration with other health care professionals.

A residency can give you a competitive edge by providing the opportunity to build upon the knowledge you have gained in your Pharm.D. program.

  • Health systems prefer pharmacy applicants who have completed a residency.
  • National pharmacy organizations recommend post-graduate training for individuals involved in direct patient care.
  • Some institutions require residency training for pharmacists seeking advanced practice privileges.

For over 20 years, St. Louis College of Pharmacy has offered residency training programs. Our programs have prepared residents to become clinical pharmacists and pharmacy practice faculty in St. Louis and throughout the country.

St. Louis College of Pharmacy maintains affiliations with major hospitals, teaching institutions, managed care organizations, and major health care corporations in the St. Louis area. Collaboration between practice sites and the College provides access to approximately 50 different residency rotations and preceptors.

Learn more about our residency programs and the application process. For questions or more information, please contact us.