Faculty and Staff Biography

 
Profile Photo

Amy Reese

Associate Professor, Microbiology
Department of Basic Sciences
314.446.8168
 

Education

B.A. Chemistry, The College of Wooster (1993)
Ph.D. Biochemistry, University of Minnesota (2000)
Post-doctoral training, Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine

Specialty

Microbiology
Medical mycology
Fungal biology
Fungal pathogenesis

Current Research

I am interested in disease-causing yeast that have a capsule, including Cryptococcus neoformans and Rhodotorula species. My research is focused on trying to understand how the capsule binds to the yeast cells and how these components are regulated. While researchers have studied the ecology, biology, pathogenesis, and impact on human immunology of Cryptococcus, little is known about Rhodotorula. I am interested in increasing our knowledge of fungal biology and pathogenesis.

http://fung4l.com/

Current Courses, Activities, and Scholarly Interest

I enjoy singing in the Royal Chorale and playing in the new campus ensemble.

Vita Highlights

Selected Peer-Reviewed Publications:

Reese, A.J., Yoneda, A., Breger, J.A., Beauvais, B., Griffith, C.L., Kim, M.-J., Liu, H., *Yang, S., *Skau, C.T., *Sefko, J.A., Osumi, M., Latge, J.-P., Mylonakis, E.E., and Doering, T.L.. “The role of a-1,3-glucan synthase in Cryptococcus neoformans capsule assembly.” Molecular Microbiology (2007) 63(5):1385-98.

Reese, A. J. and Doering, T. L. “Cell wall a-1,3-glucan is required to anchor the Cryptococcus neoformans capsule.” Molecular Microbiology (2003) 50(4):1401-1409.

Reese, A. J. and Banaszak, L. J. “Specificity determinants for lipids bound to b-barrel proteins.” Journal of Lipid Research, (2004) 45(2):232-243.

Other Related Publications or Projects:

Amy J. Reese and Audrey J Ettinger “Keeping WISE: a female undergraduate perspective on recruiting and retaining women in science and engineering.” The Communicator (Committee for the Status of Women in Microbiology, ASM) published by ASM Public Affairs Committee, Spring 2015.

STEM Girls Become FUN Gals at Cedar Crest College,” (12/11/2013) Article for Huffington Post by Diane Prosper about the Reese Research students, and Cedar Crest College http://www.huffingtonpost.com/diane-propsner/cedar-crest-college-stem-_b_4398697.html

Ettinger, A. J. and Reese, A. J. “Eliminate barriers to science and math jobs for women,” The Morning Call (October 14, 2013) Town Square / Opinion: Your View section [in response to the New York Times October 6, 2013 piece “Why Are There Still So Few Women In Science?]

Recent National and International Meeting Abstracts & Presentations:

Kelly, J. and Reese, A.J., “Overexpression of α-1,3-glucanase in Cryptococcus neoformans using two inducible plasmid constructs.” 115th American Society for Microbiology meeting, New Orleans, LA, May 2015, poster.

Reese, A.J., Korpics, S. Akers, N, Mascibroda, L., and Green, A.., “Alpha-1,3-glucanases of Cryptococcus neoformans and Rhodotorula species.” 114th American Society for Microbiology meeting, Boston, MA, May 2014, poster.

Reese, A.J., McKean, L., Akers, N., Bradshaw, C., Olson, C., Gray, A., Choi, Y., Reed, J., Scott, A., and Simmon, J., “Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus: Do They Bind Their Capsules The Same Way?” 113th American Society for Microbiology meeting, Denver, CO, May 2013, poster.

More, C. Hay, C., Rennoll, S., Symbol, B., Horvath, L, and Reese, A. J., “Why does Cryptococcus neoformans need alpha-1,3-glucanase?th 8th International Conference on Cryptococcus and Cryptococcosis, Charleston, SC, June 2011, poster.

Amy J. Reese and Audrey J Ettinger “Keeping WISE: a female undergraduate perspective on recruiting and retaining women in science and engineering.” The Communicator (Committee for the Status of Women in Microbiology, ASM) published by ASM Public Affairs Committee, Spring 2015.